Saturday, June 27, 2015

The Wizard of Time Trilogy: Number One with Kindle Kids!


The Wizard of Time Trilogy hit the coveted number 1 spot in the Children's section of the Amazon Kindle store on April 18th. This time travel adventure series by G. L. Breedon consists of The Wizard of Time, The Sword of Unmaking, and The Edge of Eternity.

First, please tell us what your books are about.
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Thirteen-year-old Gabriel Salvador has dreams about the future and his dreams always come true. When he dreams one night that he will drown, he knows upon waking it is only a matter of time before his dream becomes reality.

Plucked from the timeline of history at the moment of his death, Gabriel becomes an apprentice time mage and part of an elite team of wizards who travel throughout history to fight the War of Time and Magic.

Victorian London, the Aztec temples of 1487, the Greek island of Samos in 320 BCE, Scotland in the Middle Ages, and the battle fields of Alexander the Great are only some of the adventures in time that await Gabriel as he learns to become a time mage and joins the battle to protect the timeline of history in The Wizard of Time.

Tell us about your path to publication: Traditional or independent? Recently or further in the past?

I have the usual indie author story. I spent several years writing novels and collecting rejection letters from agents and publishers before I decided to start self-publishing in 2011. I currently have three books in the Wizard of Time series, two books in my Young Sorcerers Guild series, and a stand alone YA sci-fi book published.

What top factors do you believe put your e-book where it is now?

I think the thing that helps sell books more than anything is word of mouth – people wanting to share their experience of reading your book and telling others about it. That only happens if you write something people enjoy enough to want to share. And sometimes people want to share some of your books more than others. My Wizard of Time books outsell my others by a wide margin.

How are people finding out about your book? Tell us about your marketing and use of social media.

I’ve run bookbub ads, which helps give the book a boost, but most of the sales are from people finding it or having it recommended to them. I have a blog and facebook and twitter account, but I’ve been ignoring them lately as I’ve invested most of my free time writing and editing my new fantasy novel. I find it really difficult to make time for both when I’m writing or editing. I’m hoping to get back to posting on all of them soon.

Some studies say children reading e-books are reading more, while other studies say they comprehend less of what they read. What's your opinion or experience?

I’ve had parents write to say that The Wizard of Time got their child into reading or rekindled a lost interested in reading, so I definitely think kids are reading more. If they are comprehending less it might be due to the fact that ebooks make it easier to flip pages and skim past parts the kids find boring.

What is your target audience, and how do you believe the e-format works for that audience and serves their needs?


The books I have written so far are pretty solidly targeted to the 12-14 year old reader. I think ebooks work great for that age range – assuming they have access to a tablet or ereader. Unfortunately, most kids that age don’t yet have their own dedicated device. I think that will change as the price continues to drop for ereaders and tablets, and I think younger readers will read more ebooks as a result.

What were your initial thoughts about e-publishing? Have those initial thoughts changed now that you've done it?

I’d spent years reading that self-publishing was not only a sign of failure as a writer but would ensure that your book never got accepted by a traditional publisher. However, by the time I started indie publishing my novels as ebooks enough people were doing it that it seemed more reasonable and less risky. Now I find it hard to imagine having a traditional publisher even if that meant a wider print distribution than I can manage on my own.

As you got into e-publishing, have you discovered unexpected things?  Has anything happened that you wouldn't have predicted?

The thing that surprised me most was the effect of word of mouth in selling books. I’ve watched other writers who invested a great deal of time in social media or ads or free give always, and compared them to the sales of writers who did none of that, but who had a book people wanted to share with friends and family. The books that generate word of mouth buzz always sell more. That made intuitive sense, because I love to share books that really interest me, but it still surprised me from a practical point of view as an indie published author.

What does your writing schedule look like? What are you working on now?

I have a freelance day job, so I do most of my writing and editing between gigs. I’m currently editing my new Epic Sword and Sorcery Opera. It’s a 750+ page fantasy novel following seven groups of people in a world where thousands have begun to have dreams of a new god and a new star and begin a pilgrimage to the Forbidden Realm. One night a star appears in the sky just as the dreams foretold and sets in motion all manner of chaos for the characters at the center of the story.

Time to pull out your Magic 8 Ball:  How do you see the world of e-publishing developing for children and young adults over the next 5 years? Do you think it will ever exceed or replace print publishing?

I suspect that in the next 5 years, and certainly in the next 10, ebooks will replace print for most genre fiction, for all age ranges. It may happen slower for children’s books and middle grade YA books. I don’t think print will go away for contemporary fiction or for text books and works with large amounts of photos. Print it is very convenient for that sort of thing. I also suspect that more of the writers of those genre ebooks will be indie authors. As mass maket paperback sales decline there will be less incentive for newer authors to look for a traditional publishing deal.

Do you believe the e-format helps or hurts you as an author? How?

I don’t think people would be reading my novels without ebooks. For all I know I might be on my sixth novel of collecting rejection letters instead of getting ready to indie publish my seventh.

Do you believe the e-format helps or hurts your readers, specifically children and/or young adults? How?

I can’t honestly see how ebooks could hurt readers. They cost less, their easy to read, and they can’t fall off your overcrowded book shelf and hit you in the head. Win, win, win.
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Learn more about Geoffrey and his books by visiting his website, or by following him on Facebook and Twitter.

See the latest Kids' EBook Bestseller List for more top ten e-format authors and their books. It's usually updated every Saturday morning, but this week due to scheduling conflicts I had to compile it on Friday evening. Check back next week when my featured author will be Aimee Agresti.

Want a sneak preview of the rest of the authors I'm featuring for the next few weeks? You can sign up HERE to get my newsletter and stay up to date with the blog and my books.

Saturday, June 20, 2015

DOLLHOUSE: A Top Ten Hit with Kindle Teens

Today's featured author is Anya Allyn. Her book, Dollhouse, hit the number 10 spot in the Teen section of the Amazon Kindle store on April 4th. It's the first book of four in The Dark Carousel series, although there is a free short story prequel called Thirteen.

Anya classifies her books as young adult Gothic horror/thrillers, and she joins us today to talk about her e-publishing success.  

First, tell us what your book is about.


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DOLLHOUSE is about a group of teenagers who end up in a dark, surreal dollhouse beneath an old mansion. There's a place inside the Dollhouse, known as the Toy Box, from which they can enter into other realms--the past, a macabre carnival and some terrifying places.

Tell us about your path to publication: Traditional or independent? Recently or further in the past?

I started out with the thought of going traditional. I actually didn’t know there was any other option! I had been a features’ writer for a media organisation in Australia (from 2002-2009) and was now homeschooling one of my boys and running a small business.

I began writing fiction at night. I uploaded a short story to a place named Inkpop.com (now Figment.com) just to gain feedback from teenagers. It was a site where you gained criticism for your writing and also upvoted others for a chance to gain a review from Harper Collins. To my shock, my story sped to the top within a month or so, and I gained a great review from a HC editor. It gave me the confidence to try writing a book. By the time I’d written DOLLHOUSE in 2012, I’d just heard about Amazon and decided to try it as an independent.


I had a lot of success with Dollhouse and went on to write three more books in the series.

In 2013, I had three publishers contacted me - one large and two smaller. I ended up going with one of the smaller--Paper Lantern Lit. I felt that the PLL editor, Lauren Oliver, really ‘got’ my book and that together with the PLL team, I could make the Dollhouse book the very best it could be. This interview explains a little more about that time from Lauren’s side of things.

What top factors do you believe put your e-book where it is now?

I’m not sure, to be honest. I continue to be astounded people like the weird and creepy stories floating about in my head!

How are people finding out about your book? Tell us about your marketing and use of social media.

I will admit I’m not great at marketing. I’m an introvert who finds it almost impossible to say, ‘please review my book’ or ‘hey, here’s a book you might like’!

I keep a presence on my Facebook author page and love interacting with readers there.

I’d say that the biggest thing you can do for marketing is to write a series that people really like. Which isn’t really marketing but writing! A lot!  Books in a series can help sell each other, as each book is like its own little billboard at a vendor, and also many readers like totally losing themselves in the world an author creates--which can be difficult to achieve in the space of a single book.

Of course, advertising is a big factor in book discovery. Advertisers such as BookBub and promotions run at distributors such as Amazon and iTunes can really catapult your book.

Some studies say children reading e-books are reading more, while other studies say they comprehend less of what they read. What’s your opinion or experience?

I have four boys. There was definite frustration with the older two in not always being able to access the books they wanted to read. Now, I have a kindle, and it’s great being able to offer the younger two more variety. I’m not sure about the comprehension side of things, but I definitely think it’s something for educators to be aware of and keep researching.

As you got into e-publishing, have you discovered unexpected things? 

Things. Change. So. Fast.

That’s been the biggest thing that I’ve noticed. It’s a whirlwind and hard to keep up with it all.


What does your writing schedule look like? What are you working on now?

My writing schedule is basically this: After I drop my children off at school, I'm home by 9.30am. I start writing at 10am. Run around and do some cleaning up at 2pm and then pick my kids up again. And then there's kids' sport, homework and dinner. I rarely get more than two solid writing hours in. There are always other things to take care of in our very busy household!

At the moment I’m writing a psychological thriller--a new genre for me! I'm also working on getting together a new website of authors who write dark YA fiction: http://evereerie.com. I’ve just released a standalone YA sic fi novel (Lake Ephemeral), which I'd love to write a sequel for in the future. I’d also love to write a prequel/sequel for Dollhouse. I have so many ideas for books and it just isn’t possible to write them all!
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Learn more about Anya and her books by visiting her website, or by following her on Facebook or Twitter

See the latest Kids' EBook Bestseller List for more top ten e-format authors and their books. It's updated every Saturday morning. Check back next week when my featured author will be G. L. Breedon.

Want a sneak preview of the rest of the authors I'm featuring for the next few weeks? You can sign up HERE to get my newsletter and stay up to date with the blog and my books.

Saturday, June 13, 2015

Christopher Healy's Guide to Top Ten Success!

On March 21st, The Hero's Guide to Saving Your Kingdom hit the number 5 spot in the Kids' and Teen section of the Kobo.com store. Christopher Healy is the author of this e-book bestseller, and he joins us today. 

After a career of writing for magazines, newspapers and websites, this was Christopher's first book written for children. It has won several notable awards as well as wonderful reviews, and there are now two sequels in the Hero's Guide series: The Hero's Guide to Storming the Castle and The Hero's Guide to Being an Outlaw. 

First, tell us what The Hero's Guide to Saving Your Kingdom is about.

Prince Liam, Prince Frederic, Prince Gustav, Prince Duncan. These are the so-called heroes who became famous for rescuing Sleeping Beauty, Cinderella, Rapunzel, and Snow White, respectively. Yet no one even knows their real names—they are all simply known by the generic name, Prince Charming, and forced to live in the shadows of their more famous (even if deservedly so) female counterparts. Now the time has come for these four second-banana princes to join together on a daring, monster-and-magic-filled quest to prove to the world—and themselves—that they truly are the heroes their stories make them out to be. (And if things get rough, the princesses are always around to help the guys out of a tight spot.)

Tell us about your path to publication: Traditional or independent? Recently or further in the past?

As someone who was telling people I was going to be an author someday back when I was 7 years old, I took a pretty roundabout path to actually reach that goal. I started my professional "writing" career as a magazine fact-checker. Then I moved from double-checking other people's writing to wrangling some real writing assignments of my own—ones with an actual byline. Eventually, I was writing for a whole bunch of magazines, newspapers, and websites—everything from the New York Times to AOL. But once my kids were born, I ended up finding a niche for myself as a children's media critic, reviewing kids' books, movies, music, and video games (Hey, "Write what you know," right?). After years of that, though, I finally reached a point where I got tired of writing about other people's works and wanted to try creating my own. I reminded myself of my dreams from back when I was a second grader. So in between all the paying work, I began writing The Hero's Guide to Saving Your Kingdom—my first shot at a novel. From there, the route to publication was pretty traditional. I got an agent (who luckily turned out to be awesome), she brought my manuscript to several publishers, and HarperCollins made me an offer.

What top factors do you believe put your e-book where it is now?

I hate to say bargain deals, but when talking specifically about the e-book version of Hero's Guide, they've been a huge help. Every limited time, low-price deal has led to a jump in sales. Beyond just the electronic version, though, I credit the success of the series to a number of factors (each of which I'm incredibly grateful for!)—schools (teachers and librarians have been great champions for my books), handselling at brick-and-mortar bookstores, very supportive book bloggers, and word of mouth from kid readers. Of course, I don't know how many of those boosts I would have gotten at all if the publisher hadn't been so good about pushing and marketing the series on their end.

What is your target audience, and how do you believe the e-format works for that audience and serves their needs?

Although I have a wide spectrum of readers, the series is technically labeled as middle grade, meaning a target audience of 8 to 12. I can't say I've seen too many kids that age reading ebooks, but a lot of their parents do. I also know that a lot of parents read my books aloud to their kids, so for them, the format wouldn't necessarily matter. I do think, however, that if my series only existed in e-book format, it would not have gotten the wonderful reception it has from schools.

What does your writing schedule look like? What are you working on now?

I try my hardest to put in a full six hours of writing between 9 and 3, while my kids are at school. Once they're home, it's too easy to get distracted, so I save as much of the business-end of the job (emails, contracts, bills, website upkeep, etc.) for after 3pm. Of course, it doesn't always work out. And there's always a little thing called Writer's Block that tends to show up pretty much every day at some point. When that happens, I find it much more productive to move on to some other task, rather than sit and stare at a blank screen. It's usually while I'm in the middle of something else that the answer will come to me. My latest novel that I'm working on is called, The Worst Thing About Saving the World, and it follows the post-heroic life of a middle-schooler AFTER he's saved the day and become mega famous for it. It's set to be published in 2016.
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Learn more about Christopher and his books by visiting his website and the Official Hero's Guide website. You can also follow him on Facebook or Twitter.

See the latest Kids' EBook Bestseller List for more top ten e-format authors and their books. It's updated every Saturday morning. Check back next week when my featured author will be Anya Allyn.

Want a sneak preview of the rest of the authors I'm featuring for the next few weeks? You can sign up HERE to get my newsletter and stay up to date with the blog and my books.

Saturday, June 6, 2015

THE SIX WIVES OF HENRY VIII: A Number One Hit with Nook Teens

Today's featured author is Alison Weir, author of The Six Wives of Henry VIII. The e-book version hit the number 1 spot in the Teen section of the Barnes and Noble Nook store on March 28th. Alison is the biggest-selling female historian (and the fifth best-selling historian) in the United Kingdom since records began in 1997. She has published twenty-one books. Let's hear all about her e-publishing experience and success.

First, tell us about your book, The Six Wives of Henry VIII. 



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It's the story of the six queens of the Tudor monarch, Henry VIII. It's set in a court dominated by the will of an egomaniacal, suggestible king, and the power politics and ruthlessness that were the reality behind its magnificent facade. It tells how Henry’s six wives lived a hair’s breadth away from disaster – and how it frequently overtook them. Theirs are grim and tragic stories, set in a lost world of splendour and brutality: a world in which love, or the game of it, dominated, but dynastic pressures overrode any romantic considerations. In this world, one dominated by religious change, there are few saints.

How did you get published: Traditionally or independently? Recently or further in the past?

I went down the traditional route with mainstream publishers. I was first published in 1989, and since then I have clocked up 17 non-fiction history books and 5 historical novels.

What top factors do you believe put your e-book where it is now?

I think that the story of Henry VIII's queens has a compelling, undying fascination.

How are people finding out about your book? Tell us about your marketing and use of social media.

Through my publishers' marketing and publicity strategies. I post regularly on Facebook and sometimes on Twitter and Pinterest, but I see my website as my main point of contact with readers.

What is your target audience, and how do you believe the e-format works for that audience and serves their needs?

I have a broad target audience, as attendances at my many events show - from children younger than 9 to seniors over 90! Both sexes too.

What were your initial thoughts about e-publishing? Was it your idea or your publisher’s?

It was my publishers' idea to republish my books in this format. I'm delighted about sales, of course, but e-books are not for me personally!

What does your writing schedule look like? What are you working on now?

I'm writing a novel about Katherine of Aragon, the first in a series of six about the wives of Henry VIII. I've also been commissioned to write four non-fiction history books, so I'm going to be very busy over the next few years!

Do you think e-publishing will ever exceed or replace print publishing?

I sincerely hope not!

Do you believe the e-format helps or hurts your readers, specifically children and/or young adults? How?

I don't believe that children should be brought up expecting to have everything delivered electronically. I speak from experience, as the mother of two children, one with special needs. They are adults now, and both read e-books. but if I was bringing them up now, I would want them to experience the pleasure of traditional books.
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Learn more about Alison and her books by visiting her website, or by following her on her Facebook page or the Alison Weir Fan Club Facebook page. (Other Facebook pages using her name are unauthorised and some contain inaccurate information.) She's also on Twitter and Pinterest.

See the latest Kids' EBook Bestseller List for more top ten e-format authors and their books. It's updated every Saturday morning. Check back next week when my featured author will be Christopher Healy.

Want a sneak preview of the rest of the authors I'm featuring for the next few weeks? You can sign up HERE to get my newsletter and stay up to date with the blog and my books.

Saturday, May 30, 2015

Nook Teens Sent SEEKER to the Top Ten for Two Weeks

Seeker by Arwen Elys Dayton hit the number 6 spot in the Teen section of the Barnes and Noble Nook store on March 21st. The following week, it rose to number 4. Arwen joins us today to talk about her young adult bestseller and its e-pub success. 

Let's start with finding out what your book is about.

Seeker is a heroic family tale gone terribly wrong. It's set in the near future, in Scotland and Hong Kong and is the story of teenagers who've been raised on an isolated estate, where they've been put through years of brutal training. They've been taught to fight, mastered unusual weapons and gradually learned secret knowledge, all of which will be used for a noble purpose.

But the adults in their lives, including their own parents, have been lying to them. Now that their training is over, instead of noble acts, they are forced to do terrible things. Danger confronts them from all sides as they make a desperate attempt to get away, discover who's a friend and who's an enemy, and try to choose a path for the future.

Some studies say children reading e-books are reading more, while other studies say they comprehend less of what they read. What’s your opinion or experience?

My own children read both e-books and paper books, and often will have both versions of the same book. They love paper books because they are lovely objects to own and put on a shelf, but they also love e-books for the convenience of reading on the school bus, on a trip, etc. I doubt comprehension has anything to do with the format of the book. If anything, it's easier to look up words when using an e-book because the dictionary is incorporated into the device. But comprehension has more to do with a particular child's study skills, in my opinion, not how the book is delivered.

What does your writing schedule look like? What are you working on now?

I treat writing just like any other job and set aside a big chunk of every weekday for writing. Of course, I also have to fit in the other parts of the writing job, such as interviews (like this one!), research, and book events, so sometimes there's a bit of juggling in the schedule.

Right now I'm working on Traveler, which is book 2 of the Seeker series. I've finished the first draft! It's been quite exciting to follow the characters around the world as the story continues.

Time to pull out your Magic 8 Ball:  How do you see the world of e-publishing developing for children and young adults over the next 5 years?

I predict e-books will continue to grow in popularity. However, I've noticed readers (especially children) enjoying the print versions of books, particularly nicely made hardbacks, so I imagine readers will more and more often have both the e-book and paper version of titles. Who knows, eventually both versions may come bundled together, so when you buy a book, you are buying it in two formats, or even three (with audio).

Do you think it will ever exceed or replace print publishing?

E-books will exceed print publishing in numbers for sure, because with the e-format, millions of titles can be kept "in print," and there is instant gratification – if you hear about a book you can own in immediately. But I don't think e-books will replace print. They will live happily alongside each other.

Do you believe the e-format helps or hurts you as an author? How?

It absolutely helps me, because it keeps my books available forever, and it opens up new audiences for my stories.
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Learn more about Arwen and her books by visiting her website, or by following her on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram

See the latest Kids' EBook Bestseller List for more top ten e-format authors and their books. It's updated every Saturday morning. Check back next week when my featured author will be Alison Weir.

Want a sneak preview of the rest of the authors I'm featuring for the next few weeks? You can sign up HERE to get my newsletter and stay up to date with the blog and my books.

Saturday, May 23, 2015

Supermog! A Top Ten Hit for Children in the iBookstore.

Supermog! hit the number 4 spot in the Children's section of the iBook store on February 14th. It was written by David Elvar and illustrated by Janice Carr.  David says, "We are a partnership in this project, as you will see from the answers." Let's hear all about it!

Time to pull out your synopsis skills! In a few sentences, tell us what your book is about.

Supermog is the ultimate accidental hero. He's a cat with a passion for Fish Pie, which he is constantly trying to steal. The trouble is, he always ends up saving someone in the process. It doesn't help that he wears a cape to hide his distinctive stripy fur and a mask to hide his face, both serious prerequisites when you're a thief, but they also make him look like a superhero. And that's what people end up believing.

Tell us about your path to publication: Traditional or independent? Recently or further in the past?

Supermog is the joint creation of the author/artist partnership David Elvar and Janice Carr.

David had a long series of (albeit encouraging) rejections from various publishing houses before discovering self-publishing and the e-book format. He uploaded five children's books to Smashwords on a rainy afternoon in December 2009 and sold his first within three hours of it going live. He hasn't looked back since.

Janice is a lifelong artist who was often told that though her talent was unquestionable, she would never make a living from art. The e-book revolution has given her the chance to prove that one wrong. Being able to work in all styles ranging from cartoon to portraiture, she has at last found the outlet she needs.

Our page on Smashwords can be found HERE.

Author David Elvar
How are people finding out about your book? Tell us about your marketing and use of social media.

You name it, we use it! For example, Supermog has his own Facebook page, recently set up and written by his friend Shadwell, who relates each of Finbar's (Supermog's) escapades in the books.

He can also be found on Twitter, his user name being Supermogspage.

Future plans in social media exploitation include the setting up of a dedicated author/artist website. We need more time!

What does your writing schedule look like? What are you working on now?

Illustrator Janice Carr
Now you're asking! We also have a Smashwords page dedicated to paranormal stories for the adult market for which we are currently completing a 60,000-word novel on life-after-death, but on the children's publishing side, we've just started co-authorship of the first in a series of novels aimed squarely at the teenage girl market, the stories centred round horses but with something of a paranormal twist. And illustrated, of course. This project we are particularly excited about.

Time to pull out your Magic 8 Ball: How do you see the world of e-publishing developing for children and young adults over the next 5 years? Do you think it will ever exceed or replace print publishing?

No, it will never replace the traditional printed book, but then, it was never intended to. This is something the doom merchants seem to forget or (more likely) ignore in their headlong rush to decry the new medium. We think children will embrace the new technology but will still want the distinct feel of a well-thumbed favourite book in their hands.

Do you believe the e-format helps or hurts your readers, specifically children and/or young adults? How?

On this wider issue of e-publishing, there is no doubt the industry is changing. Agents and publishers now scan the best-seller list in the e-book charts then offer a traditional book deal to promising works. This is something we both hope will happen to us! All this can only be to the good: no more yea or nay from an editor on the strength of personal whim. From now on, the market will decide.

Has anyone ever asked what would have happened to Harry Potter if Bloomsbury hadn't taken a chance with a new title that, let's face it, broke every rule for publishing for that age group? And from an unknown writer? No, the e-format can only help the reader, of whatever age group. In our view, this is an exciting time to be writing/illustrating. 
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Find out more about David, Janice, and their books by visiting the links they provided above.

See the latest Kids' EBook Bestseller List for more top ten e-format authors and their books. It's updated every Saturday morning. Check back next week when my featured author will be Arwen Elys Dayton.

Want a sneak preview of the rest of the authors I'm featuring for the next few weeks? You can sign up HERE to get my newsletter and stay up to date with the blog and my books.

Saturday, May 16, 2015

META: A Super Hero Novel, Super Popular with Kindle Teens

On February 14th, Meta by Tom Reynolds hit the #2 spot in the Teen section of the Amazon Kindle store. Tom's book a young adult science fiction novel with a super hero theme. He joins us today to tell us all about his book and his top ten success.

First, tell us what your book is about.


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Meta is about a world where superheroes once existed, but haven’t been around for a decade. The story is told from the viewpoint of Connor, a 16 year-old who lives with his older brother after their parents were killed in the last big metahuman battle. One night he attempts to save a girl's life and wakes up to find the first new pair of metabands anyone has seen wrapped around his wrists, but soon after he learns he’s not alone.

Tell us about your path to publication: Traditional or independent? Recently or further in the past?

Both of my books were independently published. Meta was released in November of 2013 and The Second Wave came out in October of 2014.

What top factors do you believe put your e-book where it is now?

I was extremely fortunate to have an audience already with the comedy podcast that I co-host called The Complete Guide to Everything. While Young Adult Science Fiction probably doesn’t sound like the first thing you would write if you have a following from doing comedy, I tried to inject humor into the books wherever I could. Ultimately I set out to make the type of book I would have loved reading as a teenager just as much as I would have now.

What is your target audience, and how do you believe the e-format works for that audience and serves their needs?

I think so many people of all ages are interested in Young Adult Science Fiction now so I really just tried to make the book and its characters as accessible as possible. Making the book available as an ebook and keeping the cost down just makes it that much easier to impulse buy.

What does your writing schedule look like? What are you working on now?


My writing schedule is all about striving for consistency. I target 1,500 words per day, every weekday, no matter what. There are times where I’m stuck and hitting that target takes forever, but it’s an obtainable goal so I’m usually able to stick with it long enough.

Right now I’m finishing up a draft of a sci-fi mystery novel, then it’s on to a novella and book 3 from the Meta series.

Do you believe the e-format helps or hurts you as an author? How?

I wouldn’t be an author right now if it weren’t for ebooks. The speed and ease of publication made it all possible. Especially for authors writing in a series it’s a huge help I think. When a reader finishes a book they can move onto the next one with a tap or two instead of having to drive to the bookstore and hope that it’s in stock.
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Find out more about Tom and his books by visiting his website, or by following him on Facebook or Twitter.

See the latest Kids' EBook Bestseller List for more top ten e-format authors and their books. It's updated every Saturday morning. Check back next week when my featured author will be David Elvar.

Want a sneak preview of the rest of the authors I'm featuring for the next few weeks? You can sign up HERE to get my newsletter and stay up to date with the blog and my books.